HIP: Fair to opposition wards’ residents?

hdbflat_rivervale

The Home Improvement Programme has benefited the opposition wards’ residents least?

I refer to the article “101,000 HDB flats benefited from Home Improvement Programme since 2007” (Straits Times, Dec 30).

It states that “As of March, the Government has spent about $1.93 billion on HIP and $40 million on Ease, up from $1.47 billion and $30 million respectively last March.”

How much of the $1.93 billion spent went to the opposition wards?

Aljunied-Hougang among 3 town councils with largest no. of HIP-eligible flats

In this connection, according to the article “Aljunied-Hougang among 3 Town Councils with largest number of HIP-eligible flats” (Channel NewsAsia, Apr 6, 2016) – “The three Town Councils with the largest number of eligible Housing and Development Board (HDB) flats for the Home Improvement Programme (HIP) are Aljunied-Hougang, Jurong-Clementi and Nee Soon …

… the HDB is working to complete the selection of the remaining HIP-eligible flats by Financial Year 2018.

Flats built up to 1986 and have not undergone the Main Upgrading Programme are eligible for the HIP”.

Which town council has the largest no.?

Can we have an update as to which of the three town councils have the largest number of eligible HDB flats for the HIP?

Which constituency has the largest no.?

Is Hougang the constituency with the highest number amongst all single constituencies?

Which GRC has the largest no.?

Is Aljunied the GRC with the highest number amongst all GRCs?

Statistics on “upgrading” issue?

Since we are on the subject of upgrading, let’s look at some historical statistics on the “upgrading” issue and government grants to town councils.

“According to the Straits Times’ report of March 25, 2006, “The gathering storm”:

Aljunied had $560 grant vs Potong Pasir’s $113 per household?

“Taking into account all the grants from the Government, the Aljunied TownCouncil, for example, gets $560 per household for the financial year ending March 2005.

The grants include funds from the Community Improvement Projects Committee (CIPC), which is controlled by the Ministry of National Development.

In contrast, government grants came up to just $113 per household in Potong Pasir.”

In another report on the same day, “Hougang’s Low may be ‘heart’ to beat”, the Straits Times reported:

Hougang had only $111 grant per household?

“Government grants came up to about $111 per household in Hougang in 2004-05. By contrast, neighbouring Aljunied Town Council, which has access to funds such as the government-controlled Community Improvement Projects Committee (CIPC), got $560 per household for the same period.””

Do the above not make you wonder – what is the criteria used in the selection process and decisions?

Leong Sze Hian

 

About the Author

Leong
Leong Sze Hian has served as president of 4 professional bodies, honorary consul of 2 countries, an alumnus of Harvard University, authored 4 books, quoted over 1500 times in the media , has been a radio talkshow host, a newspaper daily columnist, Wharton Fellow, SEACeM Fellow, columnist for theonlinecitizen and Malaysiakini, executive producer of Ilo Ilo (40 international awards), invited to speak more than 200 times in over 30 countries, CIFA advisory board member, founding advisor to the Financial Planning Associations of Indonesia and Brunei. He has 3 Masters, 2 Bachelors degrees and 13 professional  qualifications.