Why is the cost of producing water never ever disclosed?

tap

What is the difference between the cost of producing water and the price sold to Singaporeans?

I refer to the article “PUB focuses on squeezing more value out of each drop of clean water produced” (Straits Times, Jul 4).

It states that “A significant chunk of the $435 million that has gone into water research and development (R&D) here has gone into making water treatment processes less of a drain on electricity.

But both these water treatment methods require plenty of energy. Between five and 17 times more electricity than that used to treat rainwater is needed to produce water through desalination or treatment of used water. The latter also produces sludge, which is ultimately landfilled.”

As to “PUB said that meeting future water demand with today’s technology will see PUB’s electricity requirement go up four times to 4,000 GWh a year, with the amount of sludge generated doubling to 600,000 tonnes a year by 2060.

“It’s thus more sensible to invest in making these taps more efficient and cheaper for both domestic and commercial water users here” – why is it that arguably, a very significant piece of information may be missing – what is the cost of producing water and what are the financials?

When the 30 per cent increase in the price of water was announced in Parliament last year – there was also no financial information, like cost, revenue, profits, etc.

Leong Sze Hian

About the Author

Leong
Leong Sze Hian has served as president of 4 professional bodies, honorary consul of 2 countries, an alumnus of Harvard University, authored 4 books, quoted over 1500 times in the media , has been a radio talkshow host, a newspaper daily columnist, Wharton Fellow, SEACeM Fellow, columnist for theonlinecitizen and Malaysiakini, executive producer of Ilo Ilo (40 international awards), invited to speak more than 200 times in over 30 countries, CIFA advisory board member, founding advisor to the Financial Planning Associations of Indonesia and Brunei. He has 3 Masters, 2 Bachelors degrees and 13 professional  qualifications.